Rough Guide to the Student Grant 2017

There’s a lot to think about when going to college. Financial support is one of the big ones. Each year Crosscare Youth Information service produces a ‘Rough Guide to the Student Grant’. Below is the 2017 version, available for you to download and share freely.

 

You can download the ‘Rough Guide to Student Grant 2017’ here

There have been a few small changes to the grant for 2017, but for most people the criteria and figures will stay the same.  If you are eligible for the ‘Special top-up rate’ the threshold has risen to €23,000. The grant for some Post Graduate students has been reintroduced. Mature students that had previously dropped out of college can now apply for a grant for a plc course and there are changes around counting bursaries and for children of naturalized citizens. More detail about this can be found from the Dept of Education or you can click on this link to view their recent announcement of the scheme.
Our guide will give you a basic introduction to the grant, mainly around the types of questions we get mostly get asked about, including the thresholds, figures and eligibility criteria.
Some of the other costs of going to college:

  • PLC Programme Participant Contribution of €200 per year for Level 5/6 (Colleges for Further Ed).  You are exempt from this if you qualify for The Student Grant.
  • Student Contribution of up to €3,000 per year for Level 7/8 (ITs/ Universities). You are exempt from this if you are eligible for The Student Grant.
  • Fee for student facilities e.g. internet, services
  • Exam fees
  • Costs for specific courses e.g. Art material for design courses, – some course material can cost over €2,000
  • Travel Costs

 

If you are having any difficulty with any of the student grant process, whether that s uncertainty about one part of the application, or you would like us to sit with you and help complete the full  application form, then we are happy to help with that difficulty.

You can give us a call, contact us via social media or email. We also have offices in Bray and Arklow where you can meet an information worker, but we can also make arrangements to visit other parts of the county to meet with groups or individuals.

A PDF version of the Rough Guide can be downloaded here below

Student Grant Rough Guide2017

 

Guide to Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships in Ireland have been undergoing a bit of a change of late.  Good news is there are a lot more opportunities now.  Our youth Information team in Crosscare have put together a rough guide to introduce you to the basics, but the important thing to know is that you can contact us if you have any specific questions that we can help you with.

Feel free to download and share our Guide to Apprenticeships

apprenticeshipsbweb-1

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is the term used to describe a period of training where you learn mostly on the job, mixing blocks of college work with full time employment. As an apprentice you will earn as you learn.  You will be paid for your work and you will gain internationally recognised qualifications.

 

Pre-Apprenticeship

A pre-apprenticeship course is for young people who want to do an apprenticeship but don’t have the minimum entry requirements.

These courses have both hands-on and classroom based modules, and aim to develop skills, knowledge and expertise to gaining an apprenticeship in a range of trades or industries.  For information you can contact us or SOLAS.

Craft Apprenticeships

Craft Apprenticeships are coordinated by SOLAS.

Entry requirements:

There are different entry requirements depending on the sector and job.

  • Be at least 16.
  • Have a minimum of five D grades in the Junior Cert or equivalent (QQI level 3/4).
  • In reality, however, many employers would prefer to take on those with a Leaving Cert or equivalent.

If you can’t meet these criteria, you can still become an apprentice if you:

  • Complete an approved pre-apprenticeship training course.
  • Are over 16 and have worked for at least three years in a relevant industry that SOLAS approves and have competed a successful assessment interview.

Female Bursary

To promote the entry of women into the designated apprenticeships, SOLAS/ETBs offer a bursary as an incentive to employers  to encourage them to recruit more women.  More information can be found on the old FAS website

 

Occupational Apprenticeships:

There are new apprenticeships available in areas such as;

 

NFQ level 5 to 9 is offered through the individual industries.  There are different entry criteria depending on the sector and job.  The most common way is through the Leaving Cert, however there are also other ways to meet the criteria.  Individual Sectors have different application dates and methods.

Where to find apprenticeships:

To help find employers Careers Portal have a great list of where to find potential employers here.  Also keep an eye on their ‘news’ section which details current opportunities some of which are apprenticeships.  They also have a lot of information about existing apprenticeships including training and entry requirements.
You can also contact the relevant professional bodies such as the Accounting Technicians of Ireland, Insurance Practitioners of Ireland etc.  A quick tip would be to join their mailing list, keep and eye out for recruitment drives and talk to potential employers.
Call into your local to SOLAS and make an appointment to talk to someone about apprenticeships. Check with SOLAS for details of employers that are looking for an apprentice.   Also their website Apprenticeship.ie gives advice on how to find apprenticeships etc.
If you are interested in Construction you can register your interest and create an account with apprentices.ie also see their vacancy page for current opportunities.

You can also check out vacancies online with Jobs Ireland.

Quick tip – keep at it and be persistent!

 

For more information download and share our Guide to Apprenticeships

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If you can’t find the information that you need about apprenticeships we are here to help you. You can find us in our office in Bray at St Bricin’s on the Herbert Rd, or in The Seomra Youth Centre. We are also in The Vault youth Centre each week, and can be contacted through the youth workers in Newtownmountkennedy and Kilcoole.

Our phone number is 01 2050502, or you can email youthspin@crosscare.ie.  You can also find us on Facebook or Twitter

 

Apprenticeships and other current opportunities


In our Facebook and twitter pages we have being making people aware of a number of Apprenticeship and training opportunities happening just at the moment. This post is just a quick round up of the different opportunities that are currently on offer

 

Apprenticeships

At the moment there are national recruitment campaigns happening for both the ESB and for Eir, while a new occupational apprenticeship has just been announced.

The ESB are recruiting Electrical Apprentices.

You need to be over 16 as of 1st June 2017 and have a minimum of a Junior Cert with Grade C (ordinary level)  in 5 subjects which must include Irish or English, Maths, Science (although this can include Technology  Home Ec and some other subjects)

Closing date for applications March 30th 2017

Further details can be found here

http://www.candidatemanager.net/cm/p/pJobDetails.aspx?mid=YGTWB&sid=BUDY&jid=GTBCXUWU&a=tXihOt3zRCE%253d

Note: YouthSpin hopes to host talks aimed at young people given by ESB staff. These will take place in the coming weeks in Bray and Arklow. Details will be advertised on our Facebook page, Twitter and through local groups when we have confirmed details.

Eir are recruiting Telecommunications Field Technician Apprentices

This is a two year apprenticeship, mostly field based. So applicants need to have a full driving licence before the end of April 2017. They need to have passed 6 subjects in the Leaving Cert or the LCA (Must have maths)

Closing Date for applications April 9th 2017

Further details can be found here

https://careers.eir.ie/wd/plsql/wd_portal.show_job?p_web_site_id=1964&p_web_page_id=278943&p_vacancy=eir-apprentice-programme-eir&p_lang=DEFAULT

 

Bus Eireann & Dublin Bus – Heavy Vehicle Mechanical Apprenticeship

Bus Eireann & Dublin Bus are recruiting for their 2017 Apprenticeship programme.

You must be 16 by August 1st

Candidates must have obtained the following minimum standards at the time of applying.

Grade C or higher at Ordinary Level in the Junior Certificate (or equivalent) in one sitting in the following subjects:

  1. Irish or English
  2. Mathematics
  3. Science Subject (Technology, Art, Craft & Design, Technical Graphics, Materials Technology (Wood), Home Economics or Metalwork).
  4. Any two other subjects

(Grade D or higher on higher level papers is acceptable)

Closing date is APRIL 1st

Further details are available here

http://www.buseireann.ie/inner.php?id=446

Atlantic Aviation Group Aircraft Maintenance Apprenticeship

If aircraft and engineering are your thing, then this might be the opportunity you’ve been waiting for.  The scheme isn’t actually open just yet, but it will be very soon

If you might be interested you need to like or follow them on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. They will be advertising it through their social media rather than normal ways, so their Facebook etc is the best way to find out about their different courses.
For the apprenticeship, you have to be over 17 and have a good Leaving cert.

Further details can be found here or downloaded here

http://atlanticaviation.ie/atlantic-aviation-institute/apprenticeships/
http://careersnews.ie/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Atlantic_Aviation_Group_DLB_WEB.pdf

 

Polymer Processing Technologist apprenticeship

The latest of the new ‘occupational’ apprenticeships has been launched. It is called a ‘Polymer Processing Technologist apprenticeship’. In simple terms, working with plastics and plastic moulding to produce plastic and polymer products for different industries.

polymer appUnlike the traditional apprenticeships the minimum education is Leaving Cert and the training goes all the way up to level 7. The training takes place in Athlone IT and online through Sligo IT

Unlike traditional apprenticeships where you would do a block college session, apprentices in this scheme would need to attend one day a week, while working for 4 days.

Apprentices will need to find companies that are willing to take on apprentices in order to apply. (Plastics Ireland have a map of all the different factories etc that are producing plastics and polymers.)

Further details can be found here
http://www.regionalskills.ie/ImageLibary/Midlands/Polymer-Apprenticeship-Brochure.pdf

 

Note – there is a bursary available for employers hiring women as apprentices.  This can be up to €2600 for 28 weeks.

Further information found via SOLAS here
http://www.fas.ie/en/Allowances+and+Grants/Female+Bursary.htm

Trainee programmes

Air Traffic Controller Programme

If you have considered a career as an air traffic controller then maybe a place in the Student Controller Programme would be of interest.

Applicants must be at least 19 years of age. They must also have passed at least five subjects in the Leaving Certificate (including Mathematics) with Grade C in at least two higher level papers or hold a comparable award at Level 5 on the National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ).

Note these are the minimum requirements. There is a series of follow up assessments and tests that follow the initial application.  aii logo

Closing date is 15th March

Further details can be found here

https://www.iaa.ie/careers/student-controller-programme

 

Red Rock training Scheme

To gain some real life experience of working on the set of a TV Drama, the makers of the TV Programme Red Rock are offering 6 week work placements in a variety of production  departments

Age or educational requirements are not mentioned, but applicants should submit a CV and covering letter. Red-Rock-21-june

Closing date for applications March 17th 2017

Further details available here

https://www.screentrainingireland.ie/news/red-rock-training-scheme-2017/

Other ongoing training

Carnew Training and Development Centre are holding a number of courses that start in the coming weeks

carnew

Bray Area Partnership run a number of courses, such as Safe Pass, Barista Training and ECDL.

bap logo

Jobs

The Defence Forces are currently recruiting for the Army and Navy.

Army applicants must be at least 18 years old and under the age of 25 years of age on the closing date for applications.

Naval Service applicants must be at least 18 years old and under the age of 27 years of age on the closing date for applications.

No formal education qualifications are required to join the Defence Forces as a recruit. However, you must satisfy the Interview Board and the Recruiting Officer that you possess a sufficient standard of education for service in the Defence Forces

Closing date for applications is April 5th

Further details available here for the army and here for the navy

http://www.military.ie/careers/army/recruits/

http://www.military.ie/careers/naval-service/recruits/

 

Note: YouthSpin hopes to host talks aimed at young people given by Defence Forces personnel. These will take place in the coming weeks in Newtownmountkennedy and Arklow. Details will be advertised on our Facebook page, Twitter and through local groups.

 

 

‘Nothing tastes as Good’ – a review. Plus, Its Eating Disorder Awareness Week.

We in YouthSpin have previously let you know about Young Adult books that we think tackle important issues.  As this week is Eating Disorder Awareness Week for 2017 we thought we’d double up and let you know about Irish YA book ‘Nothing Tastes As Good’ by Claire Hennessy.


We also share some facts and figures we found on the website of the excellent Bodywhys organisation. This is an important and complex issue, and this blog posts barely scratches the surface of the issue, and is intended as a pointer towards more specialised information sources.

 

nothingtastes

‘Nothing tastes As Good’ is an Irish novel by an Irish author. You might recognise the title as the first half of a famous quote by Kate Moss. The full is quote is that, “nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.”

The narrator in Claire Hennessy’s book is Annabel. Annabel is dead. She has been given an ‘afterlife’ task of being a sort of Guardian Angel for Julie, who Annabel kind of knows from school. However, Annabel died from Anorexia, and she sees her job as having to make a fat girl thin.

Throughout the book we explore the world of eating disorders in different forms. It is intense, funny, sad, and engaging. Its not a lecture. It is a story told so well. You will probably feel quite angry in parts, and find your inner reading voice shouting at one or other of the different characters. It may upset you, it will make you laugh too though. The author does not talk down to her readers and most of all you will feel challenged.

I’m underselling the book. Its not ‘just’ about Eating Disorders. There is a lot more in there to engage the reader. Its definitely one of the best Young Adult books to be published in Ireland (and beyond) in 2016.

We recommend this book for young people and for adults alike.

eadw2017

For Eating Disorder Awareness Week we put together some statistics from the BodyWhys website into one page for you to download or share.

We’ve also posted some of the posters from BodyWhys and Seechange for 2017.

  • Up to 200,000 people in Ireland may be affected by eating disorders.
  • An estimated 400 new cases emerge each year, representing 80 deaths annually.
  • Almost 14% of all admissions for under 18s to Irish psychiatric units and hospitals had a primary diagnosis of eating disorders.
  • Females accounted for 93% of all admissions of those affected by eating disorders.
  • 77% of Irish adolescents ranked body image as being important to them.
  • 57% of the young people surveyed expressed some level of satisfaction with their body image, which means 43% were dissatisfied.

body-image

Negative body image is considerably more prevalent among girls than boys.

When asked about what influences their body image, comparison with others ranks as the most negative influence on girls’ body image and bullying as the most negative influence on boys’ body image.

71.4% of Irish adolescents feel adversely affected by media portrayal of body weight and shape, with more than a quarter (25.6%) believing it to be far too thin. McNicholas et al. (2009)

Self-image was identified as the number one factor that ‘hurts’ the mental health of Irish teens. Teenage Mental Health: What Helps and What Hurts. Department of Children and Youth Affairs (2009

According to a 2007 study of Irish children and adolescents, 1.2% of Irish girls may be at risk of developing anorexia nervosa, with 2% at risk of developing bulimia nervosa. Source: McNicholas, F. (2007) Eating Problems in Children and Adolescents.

eating-disorder-stats-poster

Download Our EADW statistics Poster

The Bodywhys Website address is http://www.bodywhys.ie

Please visit for more information about eating disorders, what they are, their causes, and importantly for ways to access support.

The Seechange website address is http://www.seechange.ie

Seechange aim to reduce stigma and change attitudes towards people with mental health problems.

Going to college 2017

DECISIONS! DECISIONS! –  Making important career decisions and  deciding which course is best for you, can be difficult. It is important to make sure you are well informed and avail of whatever support is available.

going-to-college17-cover

How Do I choose A Course?

Research— It is essential to thoroughly research all your course options and not be too restrictive.  A variety of supports and resource materials are available.

  • Talk to a Guidance Counsellor and get access to careers information and advice, college prospecti and applications literature etc.
  • Visit college websites, read their prospectus for details of the courses, including entry requirementsyes-no

    and course content. Ask yourself does the course suit your particular interest, abilities and career objectives?

  • Where possible attend open days.
  • Check out educational websites.
  • For courses you are interested in, you should also check if fees are payable. Not all courses are covered by the Free Fees Initiative.
  • If at this point you are still unsure of your exact career or course choices don’t worry, you can always submit an application, then if necessary use the CAO change of mind  facility to change your course choices (with some restrictions ) & order of preference up to the 1st July 2017.
  • Consider alternatives – maybe full time college is not for you. Are there other ways to the career you want

Useful Websites

www.cao.ie – The Central Applications Office processes applications for undergraduate courses in Irish Higher Education Institutes.

www.qualifax.ieinformation includes the title, code, content of each course available.

www.careersportal.iehave a new tool to assist students researching CAO courses.  The CAO Course Finder  courses using any combination of filters including; Career Interests, Career Sectors, Regions, Colleges, CAO points, availability of QQI Progression routes, no maths required etc.

 

College Finance

Money matters are an important factor in the whole application process.  Most undergraduate students don’t have to pay tuition fees (Free Fees Initiative) BUT there is a Student Contribution (the maximum rate for 2016/17 is €3,000).

euro_coins_and_banknotes

Check out www.studentfinance.ie for more information on finance options available including the Student Grant, Fund for Students with Disabilities, Student Assistant Fund, Back to Education Allowance etc.

You can find out more about the Student Grant and make an application at www.susi.ie. Applications for 2017 open on April 3rd. Note; last year the closing date for what they called ‘priority’ applications was in early July.  The earlier thebetter for SUSI applications to ensure you are paid in time. However late applications are allowed, possibly up to the end of October. This will of course mean long delays in getting your applications processed.

www.citizensinformation.ie has additional information on fees and supports for third -level education.

 

Studying in Europe

Our colleagues in Crosscare have a great post on Studying in Europe which gives tips and useful websites so that you can find out more about more of the options available to you!

 

Our Going To College 2017 Guide

You can download our Rough Guide to applying for College 2017 HERE or by clicking on the photo below

going-to-college-17-page-001

Keeping safe online – What do young people do online? What help is there for parents?

We have been asked this week to take part in East Coast Radio’s Morning Show series of segments on Online Safety – namely ‘teenager’s use of social media and what parents can do’.  Here we hope to give some general information we will share as well as links we will mention.

There seems to be a sneaking fear that young people are using all sorts of social media platforms that adults and parents aren’t aware of, or only the barest handle on. There is a whole other world that is an adult free zone, and any adults that are there are probably up to no good.  There are probably aspects of this idea that are true, but in general it’s an exaggeration.

What are teenagers doing on line?

In the main, they are doing the obvious. They are chatting with friends. They are keeping track of the latest developments within their social grouping and other peers.  They are developing friendships and forming romantic relationships.

They are taking photos and sharing them. Some are posting videos. Mostly for specific people or friends but sometimes for more general consumption.   Much of this is everyday conversation, banal and uninteresting except for those involved.

It’s also a chance for a teenager to present the best version of them self.  For every selfie posted a lot more are taken and discarded until one is deemed good enough to share. They are a chance to get the approval of peers.

If a young person is creative, the internet offers the opportunity to share work and perhaps get noticed. If they are skilled at something or have strong opinions about social issues they can create tutorial videos about make-up or gaming or something else relevant to their followers. Or they explain to the world why a particular issue is important. They do pranks. They make silly noises. They share their worries and their hopes.  If they are lucky they can create fame and a career for themselves. If they are unlucky, notoriety can follow.

 

Popular apps
Speaking to the young people we mostly work with, the most popular apps are Snapchat and Instagram.

Teenagers are still using Facebook, but not in the same numbers. Twitter is not so popular with young people.

There are a number of communication apps for free texting etc such as Whatsapp or maybe Facebook messenger.  Youtube remains popular for listening to music, although many will have an app  (like Free Music) that links to online content to create free music play lists. Some will have the paid for streaming apps like Spotify.

Video sharing is popular and has been added to instagram now, but Vine is popular too.

 

What’s new?

Newer apps that are getting mentioned in media are Musical.ly (22 in Google Play App chart) which allows users to lipsync to songs and share the videos.  Yellow (78 in Google Play App chart) also gets a bit of a mention, but usually in a negative light as it’s been dubbed as ‘Tinder for kids’.

 

Dangers

Young people are fairly well versed in the dangers online, but there is no place for complacency or to assume this is the case for all young people. By and large the principle issue that affects their day to day online life is cyberbullying, or temporary dramas that aren’t quite bullying but are upsetting when they happen.How they may also be exposed to inappropriate images and harmful websites. Online risks may include any or all of the following:

  • Online bullying is not just name calling or posting horrible things about a person. They include exclusion from group chats, or creating fake profiles to impersonate or to post horrible stuff about someone.
  • Grooming remains a problem as highlighted recently by the ‘Kayleigh’s story’ case in the UK.
  • Intimate or inappropriate images getting shared without consent beyond the person they were intended for
  • Clicking dodgy pages that result in computers or phones getting infected with a cyber nasty
  • Websites promoting hate speech, or harmful health choices.

 

Tips for parents

In an ideal world parents will know what their child is doing on line. They will be on their friends/followers list and can see everything their child posts online and it will be safe and worry free.

In the real world teens want privacy from their parents.  They will look to have their own phone or device so that they can go about their online life without adult interference. Parents may not know what apps are on their child’s phone, let alone how they are used.

If a child is young, it is not unreasonable to know exactly what’s on the phone and to have access to the phone and any passwords etc. But as a child grows older and is perhaps paying for the phone and credit themselves, they may expect more privacy. That time will obviously differ from person to person.

  • Talk to your child. Whether online or offline, having a good relationship with your child should mean you can chat about what they do online, what the risks are and how to avoid them. It also means that if something happens they are more likely to come to you and tell you about it.  The same messages you give about relationships and keeping safe offline often operate the same principles as online safety.
  • Educate yourself – what are the different apps used by young people? What do they do? What are the risks? Do you know how to work the phone?
  • Get your child to show you how apps work. Download apps on to your phone, familiarise yourself with some basics. You don’t have to be an expert or to join up properly. Explain you just want to have a look, find out about the settings then together you can delete it from your phone.
  • Use Spunout Safety Hub and Webwise to find out about the different apps. They are great Irish sites. Again if you can do it with your child, that’s a good idea.

Spunout will explain about different apps and sites, but information about using different phones. Eg location settings or blocking people. Webwise has sections for parents with advice, explainers and ‘how-tos’ for different things.

  • Teach and talk about disclosing person information, the dangers of friending strangers online. Highlight a common sense approach, for instance if someone you don’t know is eager to meet or is asking for photos, videos or money – then chances are they are up to no good.
  • Talk about looking at information critically. Don’t take everything at face value. Think before you click on links. Especially pop ups. Chat about click bait. Don’t be afraid to let them educate you on the dangers.
  • Discuss the dangers of sharing images online, including consequences for sharing images of other people
  • Talk about how to approach friends who may have posted photos that are unflattering – how to ask for them to be removed.
  • Teach respect for others generally and this should continue on line. If you wouldn’t show it to your granny, don’t post it online. Good digital citizenship is vital.
  • If as a parent you see something on your child’s phone you don’t like – DON’T FREAK OUT! Have a sensible chat about it.

 

There is no 100% guarantee for safety in any walk of life nowadays, but there are always commonsense steps everyone can take to keep themselves safe. Make sure your child always knows they can talk to you about what’s going on in their life. And if its all a bit scary for you as a parent, look for help. Chances are someone has gone through something similar.

Useful links

spunout.ie/onlinesafety

webwise.ie

Irish Internet Hotline

Think U Know – UK based Online Safety site

HEAR & DARE schemes 2017

bty

HEAR (Higher Education Access Route) and DARE (Disability Access Route to Education) are schemes that seek to offer University places on reduced points or extra college support for applicants that are  coming from social or economically disadvantaged backgrounds, or who are disadvantaged for reasons of a disability or learning difficulty.

We did a blog post last year outlining the different ways that you could apply and what the criteria was etc. There have been some changes this year to the DARE scheme, so we thought we would flag up the changes and remind people what the basic criteria was for each scheme. The blog post from last year can be found here (part 1) and here (part 2)

dare-2017

DARE

DARE is available for school leavers under 23 who have a disability, and that can demonstrate that the disability has a negative impact on their education. the DARE Team have a list of the types of disabilities or specific learning difficulties, along with what documentation or evidence that is needed to go with the application.

hear-info-2017

HEAR

HEAR is available to school leavers under 23 who may come from social and economic backgrounds that has a negative impact on their education. Other than income, some backgrounds are under represented in university intake, so HEAR attempts to provide support to students in families that haven’t traditionally continued into higher education.

 Changes to the DARE scheme for 2017

  • This is the second year of changes to the scheme.  Some were introduced last year including a change to define the scheme as one aimed at students whose disabilities have had a negative impact on their education. With this came an evidence based Education Impact Statement. Verification of disabilities could be done by GPs from last year, and a prioritisation of students eligible for both DARE and HEAR.
  • After a review of the 2016 changes, some more adjustments have been made
  • If applying on the basis of a specific learning difficulty, psychological assessment reports can not be of any age, however, attainment scores (whether from school or psychologist) must be from after 1 Feb 2015.
  • Development Coordination Disorders are no longer required to submit a full pyscho-educational report from the previous 3 years – they can by of any ange.
  • GPs can now complete the confirmation of diagnosis.
  • Instead of a statement there is now an ‘Educational Impact Statement checklist’ that is done by the person applying alongside their teacher
  • The school section of the Education Impact Statement has been reduced, which the Scheme says will make it easier for schools to complete and for parents and applicants to understand.
  • Applicants don’t need to include previous schools if they have changed secondary school (unless their current school is unable to capture the impact of the disability).
  • There is a more comprehensive teachers manual.

To get precise and exact information and explanation of the changes you can download or read a document called ‘Important Changes to DARE 2017 by clicking HERE

Further reading
The DARE Handbook 2017

The DARE Information leaflet 2017

The HEAR information Leaflet 2017

The HEAR Handbook 2017